SFAR 73: What is it and Why is it Important for Student Pilots?

Due to a series of “student pilot” accidents involving Robinson aircraft the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), on March 27, 1995, established a specific training requirement for the R22 and R44 helicopters. These requirements applied to students under instruction, pilots acting as pilot in command (PIC), and flight instructors. Below we provide a bried explanation of the SFAR 73 and what it means. For a detailed explanation please see the resources provided at the bottom of this page.

In order for a student, pilot, or instructor to manipulate the controls of an R22 or R44 helicopter, they first have to have received “awareness training” from an authorized flight instructor (CFI). The CFI is authorized by the FAA, and therefore able to issue the students or pilots an endorsement stating that they have received the propoer awareness training regarding the R22 or R44.

Over the years, innovations in helicopter design and new regulations from the FAA have made helicopters safer, more reliable, and easier (less complicated) to fly. SFAR 73 was an innovation to flight training that made a big difference in regard to safety and improved flight training.

For more information regarding SFAR scroll down below the videos.

ULA Training Video – R22 Collective Video

To see all the ULA Training Videos on Youtube – click here

ULA Training Video – R22 Cyclic Video

ULA Training Vidoe – R22 – AntiTorque Foot Pedals

Student Solo Flight

In order for any student pilot to solo in an R22 (assuming the student does not hold a rotorcraft helicopter rating), he/she must log 20 hours of flight first. These hours must be flown with a CFI (dual-instruction), and obtain not only the standard solo endorsements (in logbook and on student pilot license), but he/she must also obtain an SFAR solo endorsement from the instructor.

If the student wishes to skip the R22 and start in the R44, he/she must log 20 hours of dual-instruction in the R44and obtain not only the standard solo endorsements (in logbook and on student pilot license), but he/she must also obtain an SFAR solo endorsement.

The endorsement is as follows:

I certify that Mr./Ms. _______________ has received the awareness training required by SFAR 73, 2 (A)(3)(i-v) on __________ (Date).

__________ (Instructor) __________ (Certificate Number) __________ (Exp. Date)
Robinson R22 and R44 Helicopter SFAR 73 Awareness Training is the required ground training that students and pilots must have before they can manipulate (fly) the flight controls of an R22 or R44 Helicopter. The awareness training also covers Low RPM leading to Low Rotor RPM Stall, Low G leading to Mast Bumping and Energy Management.

Other Valuable Resources

SFAR Youtube Video Training (training video 1) (training video 2)

Helicopter Training Videos

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The Robinson R-22 Helicopter

The Robinson R-22 is a small two-bladed, single-engine helicopter made by Robinson, and piloted with a floor mounted stick between the pilot’s knees. The first R22 was designed in 1973 by Frank Robinson, and was first put into production in 1979. As of 2015, more than 4,600 R-22’s have been manufactured, making it one of the more popular helicopter models.

The Robinson R22 is powered by a 160 bhp Lycoming 0-320-b2c engine. This lycoming engine is mounted horizontally and is aircooled. The R-22 is a popular helicopter model for training helicopter pilots at flight schools, and we use them at Upper Limit Aviation as well

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You can get started today by filling out our online application. If you would like more information, you can call us at (844) 435-9338, or click here to start a live chat with us.

Cabri G2 Helicopter: Does it Compete with the Robinson R22?

The new Cabri G2 is a three blade rotor system that has an innovative design that some industry specialists say has the potential to compete with the Robinson R22 in the flight training aircraft market.

The Cabri helicopter was made possible due to the genius of Bruno Guimbal, who was one of the key design engineers at Eurocopter. Bruno wanted to develop an aircraft that had a small piston engine but had the safety levels of a turbine aircraft. His work helped small aircraft designers take advantage of the superior flight features of the larger turbine helicopters.

We stacked the two helicopter’s specifications (Cabri G2 & Robinson R22) side by side in the table below to help evaluate some of the important factors in these two aircraft. It appears that in a few critical areas the Cabri keeps pace with the R22 but the Robinson R22 is the most affordable helicopter, has the highest density altitude performance and has a well known reputation for reliability. Until the Cabri G2 has flown throughout the world from flight training exercises to pipeline patrol and until the Cabri G2 can document sustained performance, low cost and reliability, the flight training helicopter of choice will remain the Robinson R22.

SpecificationCabri G2Robinson R22
EngineLycoming O360Lycoming O360
Horsepower145 hp131 hp
Max Cruise Speed100 kts96 kts
Empty Weight946 lbs855 lbs
Max Gross Weight1540 lbs1370 lbs
Fuel Capacity45 gallons30 gallons
Hover Ceiling IGE5000 ft (@ 1540 lbs)9400 ft (@ 1370 lbs)
Hover Ceiling 7500 ft (@ 170 lbs + 2 hrs fuel)8000 ft (@ 1300 lbs)
Range250 nautical miles (15 min reserve)380 nautical miles (no reserve)
Price (New)$355,000 US$240,000 US
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You can get started today by filling out our online application. If you would like more information, you can call us at (801) 596-7722.

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