Category: ULA

Certified Flight Instructor Training Pays Off for ULA Graduate

Jeff Vogel, Certified Flight Instructor with Upper Limit Aviation is “Living the Dream”. Jeff instructs student pilots at ULA’s Cedar City campus. If your dream is to fly helicopters for a living, contact Jeff.  He is more than happy to talk you through the process of going through certified flight instructor training and becoming a commercial pilot ([email protected]).

Against All Odds – Chasing The Dream Until it is Achieved
Some people have a knack for spending every waking moment working to reach a goal they have set. Jeff Vogel is that type of person; he knows what he wants to do in life and won’t let anything deter him from his dream. The world of aviation can be intimidating, but for Jeff it has been an adventure. At thirteen, Jeff had already completed his first intro flight in an airplane.
“I grew up in an aviation-loving family; I have photos of when I was a baby sitting on the hood of the car watching planes come in while eating french fries. When I was thirteen I flew my first intro flight lesson in a Cessna 172. I remember that I could not stop smiling for weeks,” said Jeff Vogel, CFI with Upper Limit Aviation.
“As a kid I usually had a GI Joe in one hand and a model plane or helicopter in the other, and when I was in kindergarten I remember telling my teacher I wanted to be a pilot.”
Jeff’s father passed away when he was only eight years old. However, Jeff’s father did influence him in regard to “following his passion” for aviation.
“My father told me when I was young ‘Don’t fuss about things in life that you don’t really love or care for… if aviation is your passion and you know that’s what you want to do, give it your all, give everything you have to strive and make it work, and that really stuck with me,” said Jeff.
With his determination to become involved in aviation, Jeff flew an airplane before he drove a car, and while most kids participated in the regular extra-curricular activities after school, Jeff flew over them in an attempt to continue building his solo flight time.
“I remember my Junior year in high school, the football coach came to me and told me that he wanted me to play on the varsity football team. The coach told me that I needed to stop flying so much. I remember looking at him and saying ‘I don’t think so’,” recalled Jeff. “Football was all this guy lived for and flying was all I lived for. I remember flying over the football team while they ran scrimmages saying to myself and smiling, ‘I think I made the right choice here’.” 
Jeff_Vogel_HelicopterAfter Jeff had finished high school, he joined the United States Marine Corp while attending Ohio University and received a degree in Aviation Management.
“I went into the Marine Corp because I thought I would like to be a pilot in the military and it was good. But I realized didn’t want to pursue being a military pilot, but that’s where my love for helicopters grew,” said Jeff.
“I flew around in helicopters in Afghanistan, but that wasn’t nearly as fun as being up front and in control.  I looked at twelve or more flight schools before I choose ULA.  I really wanted to make sure I picked a great flight school. One that would take care of my needs – having an impeccable job placement rate to set me up for success.  So, I chose Upper Limit Aviation and I haven’t looked back.”
Never Looking Back – Setting Goals Until They Become Reality
After leaving the military, Jeff joined Upper Limit Aviation’s Helicopter Pilot program. Like most first-time helicopter pilots, Jeff’s first flight was one he would never forget.
“I distinctly remember my first flight in a helicopter and walking out to the flight line, seeing all the Upper Limit pilots in their flight suits and it was slightly intimidating. But everyone one was just really nice and had a fun attitude.  When we first picked up into a hover, I knew this was something special, and absolutely exciting,” said Jeff.
“I knew this was where I wanted my office to be, in the front seat of a helicopter – in the pilot’s seat.” 
Jeff_Vogel_MarinesFlight school has its challenges, but for Jeff these challenges have been learning tools he’s leveraged for success.
“My biggest challenge was being as proactive as possible. People are there if you need help, especially in Upper Limit, but its up to you to be your own leader and make sure you study” said Jeff.
“You have to be a self driven and motivated individual. I have wanted to fly since I was born. I would pick flying over everything, but sometimes it can be a lot of work. You have to be dedicated and disciplined to become a professional pilot.”
Jeff makes it clear that anyone coming into the ULA Flight program should know a few key things. “You have got to be focused and driven – you have to know where you are headed and the pathway that gets you there,” said Jeff.
“You have to be driven, but it’s a marathon, not a sprint. People can get burnt out and just go too fast without realizing the work behind it.  I like to set a good pace and focus on the finish line.”
Jeff_Vogel_as_a_young_pilotJeff does take some time to focus on other things besides flying, and has found a way to stay focused and proactive to reach his goal of becoming a skilled professional helicopter pilot. Jeff is a newlywed and he loves to ride motorcycles and enjoys the great outdoors.
“For student pilots it’s non-stop studying, and our students group up to study together, and have fun doing it… It’s a family atmosphere at ULA. In the summer students are out by the pool and they study by the pool in-between swimming and playing golf,” said Jeff.
Jeff highly recommends Upper Limit Aviation to any prospective student who has the dream to fly, especially if they are interested in certified flight instructor training.
 
“With big work comes big payoff, and flying helicopters is not for everyone. You have to be willing to sacrifice and stay focused. Everyone at ULA has had to get in a U-haul and move across the country to attend flight school. It’s scary, but understand that most of the ULA students and instructors have had to sacrifice, and those that took the leap and worked their tail off are happy they did.  For me, I am entering into a booming industry with fantastic job opportunities. I am living the dream.”  
Get Started With Your Flight Training Today

You can get started today by filling out our online application. If you would like more information, you can call us at (844) 435-9338, or click here to start a live chat with us.

ULA Students with Flight School Training Support Rescue Missions

Upper Limit Aviation is known for launching student pilots into careers flying commercially – taking students from flight school to flying helicopters and fixed wing aircraft for a living. ULA students get real-world flight school training experience during their time with us.

What makes Upper Limit different from other flight schools is their commitment to real-world flight experience training. ULA students train under a scenario-based philosophy for the purpose of being uniquely prepared for real world “industry experience”. ULA students get actual industry experience as a part of their flight school training, distinctively preparing them for their first job as a commercial pilot.

Upper Limit Aviation (ULA) flight students participate in real-life rescue missions in the Utah area. ULA has flown ten life-saving missions since the program began in August 2013. ULA student Chris Powell states, “When we jump from a scenario-based training to an actual real-world situation, that’s what we’re all hoping for as students. It’s always fun.”

What does “real world experience” mean to prospective flight school students researching a variety of flight schools? Essentially, it means that ULA is one of the top-flight schools in the US. The aviation industry, particularly employers, are aware that ULA trained pilots are more experienced, and better prepared to start flying commercial missions.

ULA – The Pathway to a Commercial Pilot Career

When looking at flight schools, most prospective students want the best pathway to a commercial career. Danielle Vogel, ULA’s Director of Admissions, states, “we talk to hundreds of prospective students each month. Almost all of them are locked on a dream to fly commercially. This is their dream job, their passion. But they want to know if ULA is the school that will take them from being a student to landing a top job.”

Michael Mower, ULA’s Chief Flight Instructor and Director of Schools, explains that ULA students are the only students in the industry to take part in rescue missions. ULA students have supported rescue missions as “coordinators and spotters”. Mower explains, “If we are able to get the students in the plane, seeing what is going on and seeing what they would be doing on these missions once they receive their license, that’s a huge advantage,” he said. “Anything to get the students more involved on these missions is great experience for them.”

Rich Cannon, the Assistant School Director, and ULA graduate stated that ULA students are frequently part of the search and rescue missions and that the experiences students receive through ULA’s unique training approach is invaluable.

ULA is committed to teaching students through real-world flying situations, opening them to incredible opportunities whenever possible. ULA flies, on average, 103 flight hours per day, 11,000 flight hours per semester. Prospective students want the real world experience because they know it will give them an advantage in the job market.

Mower shared that a few of the rescue missions have been in coordination with local law enforcement – searching for homicide suspects and juvenile runaways, including one a girl who ran away and was stuck in the nearby mountains. Mower’s team of professional pilots, along with support of ULA aviation students, spotted the girl just before sunset – they might have saved her life.  Through ULA’s efforts, they were able to get her to safety within 30 minutes of learning about the missing girl.

Get Started With Your Flight Training Today

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Upper Limit Aviation Search and Rescue Pilots Sworn In

They will serve as Special Deputies for Iron County

This past weekend thirteen Upper Limit Aviation search and rescue pilots were sworn in as official “special deputies” with the Iron County Sheriff’s Department. As special deputies, the ULA pilots can now land and pick up accident victims in support of search and rescue missions for the county.

The formal title for the 13 pilots is “Iron County Special Deputy”. The newly deputized pilots who will fly missions for the sheriff’s office are commercial pilots. ULA students will not be used in Iron County search and rescue operations.

ULA Chief Flight Instructor and Director of Schools, Mike Mower, said that deputizing its pilots means ULA can now fully assist the Sheriff’s Department. Mower said they are now just waiting for that phone call asking for our assistance, “we are standing by ready to help.” ULA has assisted in 9 search and rescue missions on behalf of Iron County Sheriff Search and Rescue.

Iron County Sheriff’s Department, Lt Del Schlosser, says, “this addition is a big move for the county and a relief to the Sheriff’s Department to have more personnel. “We currently have 37 deputies on staff and with the addition of the ULA pilots it brings that number to 50.” Schlosser said, “It’s a huge relief to have them (ULA pilots) today. They’re working as volunteers, so it’s not a burden to the taxpayers. They are doing this of their own free will.”

ULA pilots have helped coordinate past rescue missions for Iron County and local law enforcement.

Several of the ULA pilots expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in a special deputy capacity.

“In our continued efforts to be a support to this wonderful county, and the cities of Parowan and Cedar, we can’t tell you how appreciative we are,” said pilot Michael Mower. “This is going to be something that is going to increase our role and increase our level of support for the county.”

The new Iron County Special Deputies; Sean Reid, Mike Mower, Rich Cannon, Scott Banning, Greg Stine, Shae Mackie, Dan Laguna, Chris Laguna, Chelsea Tugaw, Mike Ballard, James Kofford, Ryan Dejong, and Kent Daniels.

To read the original KTUV article, click here, or click on Iron County Today – Upper Limit pilots deputized by Iron County Commission

Get Started With Your Flight Training Today

You can get started today by filling out our online application. If you would like more information, you can call us at (844) 435-9338, or click here to start a live chat with us.

He Absolutely Loved Serving in the Air Force

One Man’s Story of Being Driven by Love

Growing up in a small town; Mike Mower quickly realized that he, perhaps more than most of his peers, had a deep love for his Country. As a young teenager, Mike knew he was going to dedicate himself to serving in the Military. Ultimately, Mike Mower joined the United States Air Force. He left home and was shipped off to Lackland Air Force Base for basic training. There, Mike quickly learned the Air Force Core Values: Integrity First, Service Before Self and Excellence in All We Do. These weren’t just statements Mike needed to memorize as a new recruit. These core values would become a moral footprint that would carry him throughout his life. Mike knew, before he ever signed up for active duty, that he loved his Country. It wouldn’t take him long to realize that he absolutely loved serving in the Air Force.

Mike’s serving in the Air Force took him from his primary career field in Cryogenics to the prestigious United States Air Force Honor Guard. Mike was a Flight Sergeant in the Honor Guard responsible for the training of all subordinate Airmen under him. He himself was trained to the highest standards by the men and women who came before him at the Arlington Cemetery. You see, Mike not only loved his Country and serving in the Air Force, Mike had a brotherly love for all those he served with. To him, the Honor Guard was perhaps the most important mission he ever accepted. For someone motivated in life by love, honoring his fallen brothers and sisters was something Mike would not take lightly. This passion was not merely something he felt inside; it resonated outwardly in his performance. Mike was quickly recognized as the United States Air Force Airman of The Year. This tremendous accomplishment earned him a flight in an F-16 Fighter Jet. Although it would take nearly a decade to fully manifest itself; another love was silently and subtly engrained in his heart that day…a love for flying.

Mike’s Love for Country, Is Not the Only Love of His Life.

Shortly after finishing his initial training Mike found another love entering into his life; that of his future wife. Julie was from the same town and Mike was actually friends with her brother. Being friends with Julie’s brother, Mike and Julie would frequently cross paths. It wasn’t long before they both saw something very special in one another. Mike and Julie were married soon after and have two children together. Anyone who  has met Mike and Julie can quickly see that as a couple, there is something that radiates from them. They are not only Husband and Wife; they are best friends, loving parents and true IMG_1521_smpartners in everything that they do. As Mike drew a close to his Air Force career in 2002; he didn’t start his next chapter alone, Julie was right there by his side.

Together, Mike and Julie ran their own Research and Development Company for nearly 8 years. They found great success as entrepreneurs and even hold a few patents. The R&D Industry; like many other industries, saw a decline during the recession our Country is still facing to this day. It was at this moment, that the love Mike felt in an F-16 Fighting Falcon began to take flight. Mike made the decision to become a Helicopter Pilot and has not looked back since. Together, Mike and Julie have endured military deployments, the Terrible-2’s of two children, the stresses of running your own business and the pressures of pursuing a helicopter flight career. Love has been the key motivating factor which drove them down the roads they’ve traveled and love is their guiding sail leading them into tomorrow.

Mike Mower Today, After Serving in the Air Force

Today, Mike is the Chief Helicopter Flight Instructor for Upper Limit Aviation in Cedar City, Utah. Julie is still his best friend and partner. In fact, Julie also plays an integral role in the day to day operations of Upper Limit Aviation as their Human Resource Manager. By summer of 2014, Mike will be responsible for over 200 flight students, over 30 Flight Instructors and  roughly 10 office personnel. Early in life, Mike learned key core values from serving in the Air Force. As a small business owner, he learned quickly to empower people to do their jobs. Being a Chief Instructor Pilot has reinforced what he considers “non-negotiable” when it comes to core values. These core values stand out quickly when asking Mike what makes a good pilot:

Safety 1st, Quality and Attitude. It takes someone who understands that learning never stops. Just as important; you have to Love what you’re doing. Loving what you do and doing what you love is paramount. This profession is way too fast paced and task driven. If you don’t absolutely love flying, the stress and operational tempo of the job will get away from you.

A good pilot also needs to learn from their mistakes. This is a tuff environment and corrective action needs to be quick and decisive; people’s lives are at stake. However, we all make mistakes. You need to learn from them; correct the behavior or the action, pick your head up and drive on. Do not mope on past failures, learn from them. This is a huge pet peeve of mine.

At the end of the day it has to do with attitude, attitude and attitude. If I have a student or even an Instructor struggling academically or when it comes to flight proficiency; I can easily fix those issues if they have a positive attitude. I cannot however, fix a poor attitude. In my experience, this is often times what separates people. If you’re a good pilot with a positive attitude, I can develop you into a great pilot.

“Loving What You Do and Doing What You Love is Paramount”

This statement echoes a deeper level of profound truth than one may realize. Mike states that “Relationships are the #1 measure of success”. In any environment, not just an environment as complex as flying a helicopter, one should love what they do. Many people work jobs they do not enjoy so that they can provide for their family. This makes what Mike said so very important; attitude, attitude, attitude! If you are motivated by the love of your family; how can you not love providing for them? It may not be the intricate aspects of your job that you love; it is your family that you love. Working a hard job to provide for them is not burdensome, it is a joy. This is what Mike was trying to convey regarding the importance of having the right attitude and this is what Mike is looking for when he hires his instructors.

When looking to hire a new Flight Instructor, I look a little deeper into their attitude. I want to see their effort. Will this person take a personal interest in their students and will they want to see their students succeed? Those are two questions I am trying to get the answer to. They must take personal pride and ownership in order to be one of my instructors.

A really neat thing about my job as a Chief Instructor is the fact that most of my Instructors today were once my students. I take great pride in seeing my students progress from never having flown to teaching new students how to fly. I know that great instructors will put the effort in and take ownership of their work…and their work is their students.

Get Started With Your Flight Training Today

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Lois and Sean Reid are Finalists for Utah Entrepreneur Of The Year

Salt Lake City, UT, April 10th, 2014Ernst and Young today announced that Lois and Sean Reid of Upper Limit Aviation are finalists for the EY Utah Entrepreneur Of The Year™ 2014 Award.

The awards program recognizes entrepreneurs who demonstrate excellence and extraordinary success in such areas as innovation, financial performance and personal commitment to their businesses and communities. Upper Limit Aviation was selected as a finalist by a panel of independent judges. Award winners will be announced at a special gala event on May 29, 2014, at The Grand America Hotel in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Upper Limit Aviation is known for producing skilled, knowledgeable helicopter and fixed-wing pilots equipped to support the needs of the aviation industry.

Utah Entrepreneur of the Year Finalist Lois Reid

Lois Reid, ULA co-founder and CEO stated, “We are more than honored to be selected as a finalist for EY Entrepreneur of the Year 2014. There are several other accomplished entrepreneurs across a wide range of industries on the finalist list, and we are grateful to be recognized in such fine company. The truth is that we owe a great deal of our success to our partner schools, employees, flight instructors, and students.  We thrive because of our culture of service toward our students.”

Sean Reid, ULA co-founder and President stated, “We are proud of our team, and to be recognized by EY as an ‘electrifying company with dynamic leadership’ is humbling.”

About the EY Utah Entrepreneur of the Year Award

EY Entrepreneur Of The Year™ is a prestigious, worldwide business award for entrepreneurs. The unique award makes a difference through the way it encourages entrepreneurial activity and recognizes the contribution of people who inspire others with their vision, leadership, and achievement. Entrepreneur Of The Year celebrates dynamic entrepreneurs through regional, national and global awards programs in more than 145 cities in more than 60 countries.

For more information about our EY, please visit ey.com.

Get Started With Your Flight Training Today

You can get started today by filling out our online application. If you would like more information, you can call us at (844) 435-9338, or click here to start a live chat with us.

How Jodi Brommer Became a Commercial Helicopter Pilot

Meet Jodi Brommer, former Assistant Chief Flight Instructor at Upper Limit Aviation (ULA), who was recently hired to fly for PJ Helicopters, a helicopter company out of Red Bluff, California. Dream finally fulfilled, Jodi is now flying as a commercial helicopter pilot, and enjoying the fruits of her hard work, diligence, and perseverance.

Jodi had an impossible dream, a dream that she harbored for many years. Jodi, against all odds, took a leap of faith and followed her well-developed plan. Step-by-step, with great patience and a strong commitment, Jodi followed her plan until she achieved her dream. And she chose Upper Limit Aviation as the launching point to achieving her dream of becoming a commercial helicopter pilot.

For all the women out there that do not believe that they can achieve their dream to become a commercial helicopter pilot, Jodi has a message: “Women, who happen to be skilled pilots, are valued and highly sought after in the helicopter industry.”

It is true that the helicopter industry is currently dominated by men, but that is not necessarily by design. Helicopter employers are looking for skilled and competent pilots, period. In fact, it might even be a bonus if you are a woman with the right piloting skills.

Jodi Brommer gives much of the credit to her supportive family, the Post 9/11 GI Bill, and Upper Limit Aviation for helping her to achieve her dream.

Jodi’s Remarkable Journey Started with a Decision

Jodi’s flight school adventure began in the summer of 2011, as she enrolled in ULA with the determination with which only a few can relate. Today, Jodi is more than an aviator. She is a leader among her peers, a professional woman, a valued employee, and one heck of a commercial helicopter pilot. But her journey was not always an easy one. Jodi met turbulence and headwinds with every step she took.

“I never knew that being a pilot was possible,” Jodi Brommer.

Despite growing up poor, in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Jodi did not believe that accomplishing her dream of being a commercial helicopter pilot was possible. However, with unstoppable drive, determination, and service to her country, Jodi’s dream is more than a reality today.

Since starting her flight training, Jodi has earned an Associate Degree in Professional Pilot and is working toward a Bachelors of General Studies. She is a dual rated pilot, having earned certificates in both helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft.

My family was poor… my parents earned less than $20,000 a year and managed a seven-member household. I never even considered flying helicopters to be a possibility. Then, President Bush signed the 9/11 G.I. Bill, and in effect, I knew that it would help pay for my flight training. I realized that flying was something that I really wanted to do – so I made it happen through Post 9/11 GI Bill Educational Benefits.

Video Clips of Jodi as she progressed through Flight Training

Jodi’s parents have been supportive of her career choice from day one. Her parents were excited for Jodi, and ecstatic about her accomplishments. It is truly an exceptional accomplishment, and Jodi claims that without the VA educational benefits and ULA it would not have been possible. Jodi served five years in the Navy as a Combat Constructionman before attending flight school with ULA.

In addition to providing amazing aviation training, Jodi says that “Upper Limit Aviation is ‘the place’ if you’re looking for a home-away-from-home.ULA has been like a family since I got here; they treat me like a sister – they really do. It’s nice to have a place where you work that you feel happy to go to each morning, and that’s the key – to be happy when you go to work.

After earning her pilot’s certificates (Private, Instrument, Commercial, CFI, and CFII), Jodi was hired on by Upper Limit Aviation as a Certified Flight Instructor. While logging flight hours as a CFI, Jodi was promoted up the ULA ranks to Assistant Chief Flight Instructor before taking a job with PJ Helicopters. Jodi’s story is a remarkable one of vision, dedication, commitment, and sacrifice. If you asked Jodi today, she would certainly say that it was all worth it.

Jodi was not the only woman pilot at ULA, and she certainly was not the exception. Over the years, dozens of women have chosen ULA as their flight school. Upper Limit Aviation is co-owned by a woman. The environment and culture at Upper Limit Aviation is perfect place for a women to achieve their best.

The Sky is not the Limit!

Jodi has advanced her career thanks the opportunities at ULA. “I had an industry job offer – my first industry job outside of ULA and I took it. I was really surprised that ULA was willing to let me go, to move on, considering how much I enjoyed working here. But they put my name in the hat because PJ Helicopters needed the flight skills that I had. There’re no words to describe the opportunity I have because of it”, stated Jodi.

Jodi now flies for PJ Helicopters, a utility helicopter company out of Red Bluff, California. The company conducts utility and powerline work, law enforcement support (Marijuana eradication), as well as forest firefighting. Jodi started out earning $65,000 per year.

The coolest thing about Upper Limit Aviation? Jodi says, “ULA is specifically designed to help pilots get good jobs after flight school. It’s either do the training right and get a job, or do it cheaply and do not get a job. It’s that simple. At ULA, they do it right! I am a Post 9/11 GI Bill benefactor, and because of my training I’m already a VA success!

Jodi’s message to any prospective student with her same dream is to consider flight training with ULA, “The quality of Flight Instructors and Mechanics in the Maintenance Department is exceptional. They personify professionalism. When it comes to safe flight instruction, maintenance is extremely important, and our mechanics ROCK!

It turns out the sky is not the limit, at least not for this girl. Jodi says, “If you’re hungry and you have a passion for flying, you need to do it when you can. Flight school needs to be there for you, and Upper Limit Aviation has been.

Lastly, Jodi recognizes that there are pilots out there that are struggling to find jobs, and its a shame. Getting a good paying Tier 1 job in the helicopter industry requires more than flight hours and turbine experience. A college degree is very helpful when competing for job openings. Additionally, attending a school that is “connected” with the helicopter industry is critical. Employers are recruiting ULA pilots because they are the best. ULA pilots come with a good reputation and are trusted to do a good job.

Jodi Brommer’s Certificates and Flight Hours

  • Private Pilot Helicopter
  • Private Pilot Fixed Wing
  • Instrument Helicopter
  • Instrument Fixed Wing
  • Commercial Helicopter
  • Commercial Fixed Wing
  • Certified Flight Instructor Helicopter
  • Certified Flight Instructor Instrument Helicopter
  • Jodi has accumulated 1,200 helicopter hours and 150 fixed wing hours

Here are a few Related Articles for Student Pilots:

Top 6 Tips for Student Pilots Attempting to Land Their First Aviation Job

Tier 1 Helicopter Pilot Jobs

Six Student Pilots Mistakes That Can Ruin an Aviation Career

Get Started With Your Flight Training Today

You can get started today by filling out our online application. If you would like more information, you can call us at (844) 435-9338, or click here to start a live chat with us.

Schedule a Intro Flight with ULA

Are you ready to LEARN TO FLY today? Call Upper Limit Aviation at 844-iFLYEDU and schedule a intro flight, or click here to find out more information about our flight school. Need financing for flight training? If you’ve always dreamed of flying, or your desire is to become a commercial pilot, now is the time to make the commitment and realize your dream. Upper Limit Aviation has been training student pilots since 2004, and now is your time to take flight.

Stacy Steele’s intro flight was an amazing experience, beyond words, beyond description, and just what she needed. When Stacy arrived at Upper Limit Aviation to take her intro flight, she really did not expect to fly. Stacy thought she was just along for a ride. With ULA Chief Flight Instructor, Alan Carver, at the helm, Stacy actively participated in the takeoff, flight of the aircraft, and landing. Stacy was hooked.

Watch Stacy’s Intro Flight Experience with Upper Limit Aviation

Most people describe their first flight (actual “non-passenger” flying experience) as one of the most amazing experiences of their life. If you’ve always dreamed of flying an airplane, it all starts with your intro flight. So what are you waiting for? If you have not taken an intro flight, schedule one now.

If you are looking to learn to fly with Upper Limit Aviation, your first step is to schedule an intro flight. Most flight schools and instructors charge a reasonable rate for an introductory flight. Upper Limit Aviation offers serious student pilot candidates a great deal on their intro flight, and we go beyond what other schools offer.

Scheduling an introductory flight is not as complicated as you would think. We do suggest that your flight be scheduled to be flown in good weather conditions. Bad weather conditions (wind, or rain/snow) is not advised for your first flying experience.

When you arrive at Upper Limit Aviation, you will be well taken care of. We realize this might be your very first flying experience, and we want to make sure that it is a memorable one. You will be flying with an experienced flight instructor. Remember, no matter how experienced your flight instructor might be, he or she was in your shoes at one time. They uniquely understand the importance of an awesome introductory flight.

Before you go anywhere your instructor will take you through the preflight inspections (be ready to ask all the questions you can think of). Before you depart the tarmac, your flight instructor will cover the basics of the airplane (instruments, flight controls, shoulder harnesses, start procedures, taxi procedures, communication with the tower, and a checklist of safety items). Your first flight and every flight after that will be all about safety – now you are ready for takeoff.

Your flight instructor may allow you to taxi the aircraft to the runway, allowing you to steer the airplane. The instructor will always be flying the plane, but he or she may have you keep a hand on the control yoke and your feet on the pedals. This way you get a realistic feel for flying the plane. At this point, your instructor will take you through basic flight maneuvers, and described the “what and why” of each maneuver.

Your first intro flight will take about 30 minutes in the air. After flying, you will be encouraged to spend some time discussing your flight experience with your instructor. It is recommended you ask all the questions that come to mind. If, after your intro flight, you are set on earning your Private Pilot’s license, then it’s time to enroll.

Most ULA student pilots are considering a career in aviation, so they continue with ULA after earning their Private Pilot certificate. Upper Limit Aviation can take a student pilot from Private Pilot, Instrument, and to Commercial in 9 to 12 months. If you are also looking to obtain your Certified Flight Instructor and Certified Flight Instructor Instrument ratings, you can do so through Upper Limit Aviation by adding another six months of training.

For more information about scheduling an intro flight with Upper Limit Aviationcall us at (801) 596-7722.

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